Researcher and neurologist grateful for early-career grant

The Oregon Charitable Tax Checkoff grant was the first research grant I ever received.

I was a neurology resident at the time, and with guidance from Dr. Jeff Kaye, the OHSU Layton Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease Center director, I applied for funds to complete a clinical study of a commonly used “outcome measure” in clinical trials with Alzheimer’s disease.2015_02_NEU_Liedtke_129-1200x628

That was also my first clinical research study.  We were able to publish the results in an excellent neurology journal, and the study introduced me to several leaders in the Alzheimer’s research field.

The Oregon Charitable Tax Checkoff pilot grant and its products were key to my subsequent receipt of a “VA Career Development Award”, a 6-year grant that included a faculty appointment and “protected time” to launch a research career.

Since then I’ve been fortunate to continue in academic neurology, publish more than 100 scholarly papers, and advance to a leadership position.

I’m very grateful for the Oregon Charitable Tax Checkoff grant and the start it gave me towards a very satisfying career.





Joseph F. Quinn, M.D.
Professor of Neurology, OHSU School of Medicine



You can contribute to Alzheimer’s research—in Oregon—by donating part, or all, of your tax refund to “Alzheimer’s Disease Research” on Schedule OR-DONATE, Oregon Charitable Checkoff Donations, on your 2016 tax form.

This research will increase our understanding of Alzheimer’s and bring us closer to new treatments, test ways to give effective support to caregivers and families of persons with Alzheimer’s disease and pave the way for additional funding from the National Institutes of Health and other national research programs.

Funds are administered through OHSU under the direction of Oregon Partnership for Alzheimer’s Research.

For more information, please contact:
Allison Lindauer, Ph.D., N.P.
Layton Aging and Alzheimer’s Disease Center