Taking stock of the evidence for ‘off-label’ use of cancer drugs

Doctors often expand the use of cancer drugs to situations beyond those explicitly approved by the Food and Drug Administration. And health plans will pay for those uses as long as they are supported...

What magnitude of benefit is meaningful to cancer patients?

Oncologists often use the phrase "clinically meaningful benefit" to describe the effect of an experimental treatment. But is the benefit meaningful for patients? A new paper suggests that benefit...

Cancer translated’s top blog posts of 2017

From basic science to survivorship and patient advocacy, the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute’s 'Cancer translated' blog explores new ideas and debates in cancer medicine. We sorted a year’s worth...

Unmasking the cost of cancer drug development

Cancer drug R&D spending may be a fraction of the estimate cited by the biopharmaceutical industry. The average price of anticancer drugs has been rising by about 10 percent annually in...

When evidence contradicts entrenched medical practices

Medical reversal is the phenomenon when a medical practice falls out of favor not by being surpassed, but when researchers discover that it didn't really work all along. “I think the lesson of...

When cancer drug marketing sneaks into a soap opera plot

Polycythemia vera is an uncommon blood cancer that can be controlled with long-established treatments. So it seemed more than a little suspicious to Vinay Prasad, M.D., M.P.H., when the disease took...

Lessons from Oregon about end-of-life care

At the end of life, people in Oregon are more likely to have their care wishes honored, less likely to be hospitalized and more likely to use home hospice services compared with people in...

Charting the financial conflicts of doctors on Twitter

A detailed look at the tweeting habits of more than 600 hematologist-oncologists found that 72 percent were recipients of industry money for consulting, travel, lodging, or food and beverage. It's...