Exercise as medicine for cancer: Q&A with Kerri Winters-Stone

Cancer patients don’t need to avoid physical exertion, including exercise – contrary to once widely held belief. Exercise is not only safe during and after cancer treatment, studies have found...

Check out the Knight Cancer pilot project award winners

Preventing skin cancer with a DNA-repair enzyme. Understanding how microRNAs modify cancer immunity. Using zebrafish embryos to rapidly assess toxicity of anticancer drug combinations. These are...

How strength training may improve cancer survival

Cancer survivors who engage in strength training or other vigorous physical activity tend to live longer and have a lower risk of recurrence than those who don’t work out. A new study helps explain...

Unmasking the cost of cancer drug development

Cancer drug R&D spending may be a fraction of the estimate cited by the biopharmaceutical industry. The average price of anticancer drugs has been rising by about 10 percent annually in...

Surviving sarcoma: a free educational conference for patients, families

Sarcoma patients and their families are invited to participate in an interactive panel discussion and have their questions answered by OHSU physicians and surgeons who focus on the cancer, which...

Widely used prostate cancer treatment may worsen risk of falls

Men with prostate cancer became more vulnerable to falls if they used androgen deprivation therapy, and the heightened risk of falling persisted for more than a year after ending therapy, a study...

Oregon’s Death with Dignity Act, 20 years later

In 1997, Oregon became the first state to make it legal for terminally ill patients to self-administer a prescription to hasten death. A review of 991 cases of lethal self-medication through...

Lessons from Oregon about end-of-life care

At the end of life, people in Oregon are more likely to have their care wishes honored, less likely to be hospitalized and more likely to use home hospice services compared with people in...