Help researchers understand Oregon’s cancer needs

A new survey from the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute aims to help researchers understand the cancer-related needs of Oregonians and inform ways to address those needs across the state. Figure:...

Bringing together the leaders in cancer early detection

The Early Detection of Cancer Conference is part of a long-term commitment to invest in early detection, to understand the biology behind early stage cancers, find new detection and screening...

Oregon’s colonoscopy trailblazer steps into new leadership role

Colorectal screening, primarily by colonoscopy, contributed to a steep drop in cancer incidence (Yang et al. 2014). David Lieberman, M.D., professor and head of gastroenterology and hepatology in...

Making sense of colorectal cancer screening choices

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer death among men and women in the U.S. But there is shockingly large regional variation in mortality, in part because of sharp differences...

Predicting colon polyp risk from microRNA

Differences in microRNA in colon polyps may help identify high risk cases that require more frequent follow-up screening, according to a study with four OHSU co-authors that is featured on the cover...

Making better decisions to prevent colon cancer

Colorectal cancer mortality rates (per 100,000) are as much as six times higher in red counties than in those colored dark blue. (Source: NCI SEER data 2007-2011) To prevent deaths from colon...

The promise of early detection

Nearly a century ago, a Greek immigrant physician in New York City began refining microscopy techniques for examining cells gently scraped from the female reproductive tract. The results were...

Engineering precision in cancer early detection

Sadik Esener, Ph.D., is the engineer tapped to lead a major new cancer early detection program at the OHSU Knight Cancer Institute. Medical science has come up with only a few ways to detect...

How cancer screening may fail to save lives

With the advent of mass screening by Pap smear, cervical cancer incidence and death rates declined by more than 60 percent in the U.S. between 1955 and 1992. It was a triumphant demonstration of the...