Thanks for the memories

Six years. 72 months. 2,190 days. 52,560 hours. 3,153,600 minutes. I began graduate school as an early 20-something in September 2011. I wanted to be a scientist, I wanted a Ph.D. I knew it would not...

Finding support

  Our guest post today is from Sarah, a graduate of the OHSU School of Nursing's Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Master's program this past June. She is currently finishing her Doctor of Nursing...

It is possible to make SAD not even seasonal!!!

I am writing my first blog post based on my experiences in Portland and my struggle with depression soon after I landed here. I am not writing this to bring about sympathy or pity but just to boldly...

Twenty-six months in the making?

For every day that I have spent introducing myself to patients as Lauren Liebling, “a physician assistant student working with Dr. So-and-so” I have been met with at least one “Oh that’s...

Reflections after analyzing data from a failed experiment

The feeling is sickening. Your stomach sinks immediately, plunging thickly into darkness. Then, a sense of vertigo, a chilling Hitchcockian background-moving-but-character-standing-still effect where...

Live from SGIM in D.C.

Participating in the world of academic medicine has exposed me to some truly unique patients. I have also been fortunate to work with attendings who value research and innovation and encourage their...

Flow and work

OHSU StudentSpeak is pleased to present this guest post from Gary Josephsen, M.D., an affiliate professor of emergency medicine, OHSU School of Medicine, and student preceptor. The surprising way...

Med school life in Zambia

OHSU StudentSpeak is pleased to present this guest post from Malerie Pratt, a medical student in the M.D. Class of 2018 and a Swindells Family Scholar. I’m thankful for the faculty at OHSU...

Final thoughts from the Emergency Department

It is 8 p.m. Two hours remain on my final shift in the Emergency Department. The lobby is full and we are working at a fast pace. My preceptor asks me to go see the patient in bed three. A...